ACBL Unit 147

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Washington Bridge League Solver's Club  -  Jan/Feb 2006

Moderator: Steve Robinson    


Congratulations to Ellen Cherniavsky who came in first with a score of 490. She wins a free entry to the Unit Game and will be invited to be on a future panel. Second was Larry Kahn with a score of 460 Tied for third were Yi Zhong, Mark Chen, Joe Lentz, Bob Boorman and John Lawrence with a score of 440. Eighth was David Chechelashvila with a score of 430. Ninth was Michael Pearlman with a score of 420. Tied for tenth were David Rodney, Terry Carpenter, Noble Shore, Jim Wakefield and Josh Donn with a score of 410. Tied for fifteenth were Linda Gaylor, Barbara Israel, Elliot Grant, Sam Keiter, Craig Olson, Robert Stone and Dave Abelow with a score of 400. The average score of the 165 solvers was 326. The average score of the experts was 390.

All readers are encouraged to send answers and/or new problems to Steve Robinson, 2891 S. Abingdon St. #A2 Arlington, VA, 22206-1329. In addition to the winner receiving a free play at the WBL Unit Game, Steve will play with anyone who gets a perfect score or who exactly matches all five of his answers. If you send a self-addressed stamped envelope to the above address along with your answers, I will send you a copy of the new problems to ensure that you can meet his next deadline. You can pick up a copy of the problems at the WBL Unit Game in Maryland, and can send answers or requests for problems to robinswr@erols.com. You can also see and answer the problems at the WBL web site. WBL Solvers Club uses Washington Standard as published July 1996.

I personally score all the problems. If a majority of the solvers vote for an answer, and the answer is reasonable I will give that answer 100 points. I will not give 100 points to an answer that I consider bad no matter how many experts vote for it. There are times when I want to make a point. I will give that answer 100 points and will therefore give the majority answer 90 points. For the other answers I consider how good the answer is and how many experts vote for it for its score. If you submitted an answer that got 20 points, that bid would get a bad score at the table. A good exercise would be to figure out why I gave your answer 20 points. You might have misread the problem.

The book Washington Standard second edition is out.  If you are a serious bridge player, this book is a must.  You can purchase a copy from Steve for $25.00 at the Unit Game, at tournaments or can send him a check for $29.05 that includes $4.05 for priority mail. 


Problem 1 

Imps

Vul: None

West dealt

South Holds


- AKQJ54

- KQ103

- A

- 54

The Bidding Thus Far

South

West

 

North

East

----

1

 

Pass

1

?????*

 

 

 

 

* 2 - Natural

The Panel's Votes

Action

Score

Expert's

Votes

Panel's

Votes

4

100

7

31

Pass

80

2

29

2

60

1

23

Dbl

40

3

72

3

20

0

4

2

20

0

3

1NT

20

0

1

3

20

0

1

4

20

0

1

What is your bid?

If partner has the Jack of hearts and spades break, you can take six spades, three hearts and a diamond. That’s making 4. There are two sure ways to get to 4. You could jump directly to 4. A direct 4 has the advantage of being natural and preemptive. The second way is to pass and then bid 4. Passing allows you to change your mind if East rebids his spades. If West rebids 1NT, you might get a chance to play 1NT doubled. If East was kidding about his spade bid, West might actually have enough points to jump to 2NT. You’ll get information as to the opponent’s distribution. On the other hand, if the opponents have a minor-suit fit, passing gives them room to find it. Seven experts bid 4 directly.

Parker: ”4---If 2 is natural so is this. Any other bid such as double will just get things complicated later on. I think I can make 4 so I bid it. Simple game.”

Woolsey: ”4---Riddle: What is AKQJxx called? Answer: It is called trumps. A takeout double will be right only if North has hearts and East has five spades. Against that, the 4-call could put West under a lot of pressure if he has a long diamond suit or a minor 2-suiter, either of which is quite likely. In addition, if I double and partner bids clubs, will he then take my spade bids as natural? I don't want to take the chance that he will think otherwise.”

Deverin: ”4---Why not?  West may have only four spades, and partner needs only to have Jxx in hearts to give us a good shot. Also, it's pre-emptive.”

You figure to make 4 unless West has more then four spades.

Theurer: ”4---I'm not sure if I can make this, but it also gives the opponents a guess. They may have a big fit in one/both minors and a good save or make there, but it also could be partner with the minors. Tough to double to try to find hearts, since after the expected club response, spade bids by me will sound like cuebids. Just the heart Jack in partner's hand gives me a play if RHO doesn't have five spades.”

If the opponents have a good save, they will usually find it. With neither vulnerable, +300 would be a good IMP score.

Lublin: ”4---It has to be natural and all I need is the heart Jack to make it and not a 5-1 break in trump.”

Or a 7-0 break!

Landen: ”4---I bid what I think (hope?) I can make. At least this bid shouldn't confuse partner. Doubling and then later bidding spades, at whatever level, will muddy the waters unnecessarily.”

Adams: ”4---I really want to double on this hand, but I do not know any follow-up over partners club bids where spades are natural. This is probably the only way to bid naturally. 2, hoping for a second bid is overly hopeful. If I thought double followed by 4 showed Spades, I would double. If they save in 5, I have to guess.”

Three experts make a takeout double. I don’t think they thought about the follow-ups. One fatal scenario is partner bidding clubs. All spade bids by you might be interpreted as cuebids or splinters. If partner does bid hearts how can you be sure he’s not 3352?

Cappelletti: ”Double---Here the double is even more clear since partner might bid hearts. I have seen a similar problem solved by Schenken's rule that a second major suit "cuebid" where you have other cuebids available is to play.”

King: ”Double---2 may be natural, but it is non-forcing. If partner has Jxxxx of Hearts and out, game is almost cold and even with less, there is a play.”

Roman: ”Double---It's true that 2 here is natural, but it would be a serious underbid, since we obviously want to play in game. 4 if partner bids them, 4 spades if he doesn't.”

One expert agrees with me and passes. If I was vulnerable and they were not I would be more worried about the opponents finding a cheap save.

Hopkins: ”Pass---My hope is that 1NT will come back to me so I can double for penalties. Also, I should be able to double Diamond (or Club) contracts for take-out later, if necessary.”

One expert voted for Reagan (conservative). With 19 HCPs, why do you think there’s going to be further bidding?  2 is mostly played as natural with opener’s minor or 1NT played as Michaels. I like 1NT to be an opening 1NT, 2 natural and 2 Michaels. A lot of players respond on nothing so you have to be able to show a strong balanced hand.    

Schwartz: ”2---Only reasonable way to get to spades is to bid them now. Might be able to get hearts in later.”

Don’t create unusual bidding sequences because partner might not be able to field them.


Problem 2

Imps

Vul: None

West dealt

South Holds


- 3

- 6543

- K54

- AKJ103

The Bidding Thus Far

South

West

North

East 

----

2

Dbl

Pass

?????

 

 

 

 

The Panel's Votes

Action

Score

Expert's

Votes

Panel's

Votes

3

100

4

30

2NT

90

3

10

3NT

70

3

28

3

60

1

28

3

50

2

43

4

40

0

9

4

30

0

7

2

20

0

9

Pass

20

0

1

What is your bid?

 Partner has made a takeout double. You have a four-card heart suit, a diamond stopper, a five-card club suit and a game-almost-force, four pieces of information that you want to tell partner. And it would be nice to play the final contract from your side. There’s no system that would tell partner everything. Which pieces of information are you going to show? It’s usually right to play in an eight-card major suit fit, hearts assuming partner has four of them. However, your hearts are the 6543. Give partner a typical takeout double AJxxAJxxxQxxx, 3NT has very little play and 4 just needs a hearts to break 3-2. You could just as easily give partner AKQxJxxxQQxxx and 4 has no play. I try to be consistent. When partner makes a takeout double, I try to bid a four-card or longer major if that is possible. If partner does not have four hearts, you probably belong in 3NT. If you want partner to choose between hearts and notrump and you’re playing Lebensohl, you bid 2NT which forces partner to bid 3. You then bid 3, which is game-forcing Stayman with a stopper. 2NT followed by 3NT shows a hand with a doubtful stopper such as Qxx or Jxxx. The type of stopper, that you want partner to run with a singleton or void. This is just the opposite of Lebensohl over 1NT. The logic is who is more likely to have the stopper. After a takeout doubler it’s the responder, after the 1NT-opener is the opener.

Two experts agree with me and bid 2NT.

Woolsey: ”2NT---I assume we are playing Lebensohl. I will follow with 3NT. This shows doubt about notrump. Partner will run with a stiff small diamond, and then we can get to 4 or 5. That is better than insisting on hearts and finding partner with only three-card support.”

Woolsey is not even going to show his four-card heart suit.

Schwartz: ”2NT---Followed by 3, Stayman with a stopper. If my diamond King is not worth anything this is an overbid but at least I get to 4 when it’s right.”

Stayman with a stopper! If partner is flat, he might not show his four-card major knowing that you are suggesting notrump.

Four experts cuebid. Usually when you cuebid in this type of auctions you have two places to play. The cuebid will make sure that you don’t play in a 4-3 heart fit. You promise another bid when you cuebid so partner should not jump to 4 with extras. The worst scenario is doubler, who happens to be 3325, bids 4. 3 followed by 3NT over 3 shows four hearts and a diamond stopper.

Adams: ”3---Followed by 4 or 5 if partner jumps in Spades. Shows hearts that will not play well opposite three-card suit.”

Hopkins: ”3---I am going to raise 3 to 4 and bid 3NT over 3. The only worry I have if we end up in 4 is that I might have wrong-sided the contract.”

I’d be more worried my king of diamonds being worthless.

King: ”3---Either 3NT or 4 could be the best game. I want to start with a game force and see what partner bids.”

Landen: ”3---I need the added flexibility that the cuebid affords to maximize the probability of reaching the correct strain. If partner doesn't bid hearts I will bid 3NT.”

Three experts bid 3NT. Can’t partner have AxxxKQJx-Qxxxx. 4 easily makes and 3NT is down. If you had to make the final decision, 3NT would be a reasonable shot but Lebensohl allows you to show doubt about notrump. Woolsey ignores the heart suit also but at least plays in a suit contract when doubler is short in diamonds.

Cappelletti: ”3NT---Nine tricks in notrump probably more likely than three or fewer losers in hearts.”

Parker: ”3NT---Too many times partner puts down a dummy of 8762 of hearts and we can make 3NT but go down in 4 because of a bad trump split. I should have six tricks in my hand and hope partner has three. I might get tapped out of trump in both hands and never score my clubs in hearts. If I bid 3 I am forced to bid 4 over 3, since 3NT bid shows four spades if I don't raise hearts.”

Roman: ”3NT---If my hearts were a four-card suit (say J10xx or better) I would bid 2NT (Lebensohl) and then 3NT, telling partner I had two places to play, but not here.”

Two experts follow my rule. Opposite a takeout double bid a major whenever possible. The problem with 3 is that it is not flexible. You will play in hearts, even opposite Jxx.

Deverin: ”3---Jump to show a little extra opposite partner's double. With bad hearts, he may bid 3NT to play or 3 at which point you will bid 4.”

Over 3, partner will not look for a different strain. His only two options are to pass or bid 4.

Lublin: ”3---Invitational because of bad suit and diamond King.”

One expert bids his strong club suit. Over 3, partner will think about 3NT and 5 as possible game contracts, not 4.  With no club help, he might pass 3 with a fourteen count.

Theurer: ”3---Tough problem - difficult to find both correct level and strain. My hearts are so bad I'm not sure I want to play in that suit even opposite some decent four-card holdings, and he could have only three of them. I'm tempted use Hamman's rule and bid 3NT, but I'd need the clubs to run plus three fast major suit winners from partner.  Besides, being nonvulnerable I don't think I need to be quite so pushy. Partner might find another call and we can still get to game, but if he has a minimum, 3 could be our only making spot (example hand for partner: KQxxAQxxxQxxx - RHO didn't raise diamonds, increasing the chance partner doesn't have a stiff diamond).”

When in doubt make the most flexible bid.


Problem 3

Imps

Vul: EW

South dealt

South Holds


- K10874

- 65

- AJ3

- K43

The Bidding Thus Far

South

West

North

East

1

2*

Dbl

2NT* *

Pass

3

Pass

Pass

?????

 

 

 

*  Michaels          * *  Asks for minor

The Panel's Votes

Action

Score

Expert's

Votes

Panel's

Votes

Dbl

100

4

45

3

50

2

14

3NT

50

2

3

3

50

0

12

3

50

0

3

Pass

40

5

87

What is your bid?

    You are dealt AxAQJ10K10987A2. Partner opens 1 and you are thinking about how you are going to get to slam when RHO bids Michaels and he’s vulnerable. Double you say, hoping they will end up in hearts. Double says that you have at least 10 HCPs and can double at least one of their suits. Double is like a redouble of a takeout double. When you redouble a takeout double you want to double the opponents if they land in one of your suits. You want partner to double if they land in one of his suits. LHO bids 2NT asking for overcaller’s minor and sadly the Michaels bidder bids 3. He has clubs and hearts. You pass hoping that partner can double.  Maybe you should double but what if partner has a singleton club. You have your lead ready, the ace of clubs, when  ---

Cappelletti: ”Pass---Your partner merely has ten points (or more) and fewer than three spades. Simply defend and try to go plus.”

Partner’s double is forcing. Forcing means that YOU CAN’T PASS. Since the opponents are not playing in hearts, partner has a penalty double of hearts. Where are their tricks coming from? They are in at best an eight-card club fit, have less than half the points and partner’s hearts are behind the Michaels bidder. This should be bloody.

Landen: ”Pass---Partner probably intends his pass as forcing, but what can I bid? 3NT wth no tricks? Double with little defense? If we can make game then they should go down a couple of tricks here (the four of clubs is on the table before I pick up my pass card) so we'll only lose five IMPs more or less.”

A lead out of turn would be bad for the defense since declarer can now bar a trump lead.

Roman: ”Pass---I guess I'm being asked if partner's pass is forcing. No, it's not.”

I probably should have given the pass zero points but I was feeling generous.

Two experts have a different interpretation of partner’s double of 2.

Deverin: ”Pass---I assume partner's double shows a small spade raise.  (I didn't buy your book.)  He doesn't have much and you don't either, so quit now before they find a game they can make.”

Hopkins: ”Pass---This depends strictly on your agreements and I'm not sure if there is a standard. If partner's double just showed a raise to 2 (my agreement with all partners), then you have nothing further to say. If partner shows a penalty oriented hand (in analogy to standard practice when they Michaels over our one-of-a-minor opening, then you should double.”

    Three experts agree with me and make the correct bridge bid. The opponents have given you a chance for a jackpot and only three experts join me and cash in.

Parker: ”Double---Pass by partner is forcing so I must bid. I have three clubs and no long suit so a double is mandatory. Pass by him just denies three clubs and three spades.”

Woolsey: ”Double---Partner has announced that we have the balance of strength. He doesn't have a spade fit, and he figures to have a doubleton club or he wouldn't want to defend. He also figures to have hearts under control. Where will the opponents take any tricks? The play figures to go: Trump lead, and declarer plays on hearts. I overruff dummy on the third round of hearts and if the second round of trumps hasn't been played I play it, removing dummy's last trump. End of the line for declarer. I think +800 is a lot more likely than -670, with +500 the most likely estimate.”

Notice the trump lead. Lead trumps when you have the balance of the HCPs to stop possible ruffs.

King: ”Double---I think partner's pass is forcing. With a better hand I would have doubled 2NT, so partner should not expect much more than this.”

Four experts fail to cash their lottery ticket.

Theurer: ”3---Partner's pass is forcing and he clearly has the red suits and is hoping I can double clubs. My holding there isn't good enough, and besides, my hand is dead minimum overall. At matchpoints I might chance a double trying to get +200, but at IMPs I can't take that chance - better to bid something and hope to find our best contract.  Partner may only have the same strength I have so can't bid 3NT unless he shows extras.”

Lublin: ”3---Partner is likely to have hearts and diamonds and if he bids 3 I bid 3NT.”

Schwartz: ”3NT---I am going to assume the opponents are sane and 2NT shows real minor preference as they have pass and redouble to make partner pick a suit. At matchpoints I would chance double but IMPs its too big a risk and they probably won't be able to double 3NT. Partner must have a heart stopper on this auction so don't want to fool around with 3. This auction is forcing or I would pass.”

The opponents could be sane, West holding xKJ9xxxxAQ10xx for instance, and with trump leads +800 is easy.

Adams: ”3NT---Partner has hearts stopped, I have clubs stopped, and partner expects me to bid again. Maybe down two will be a push VS 3 making, maybe partner will have the real deal and we go plus.”

It’s important in partnerships to know which bids are forcing and which bids can be passed.


Problem 4

Matchpoints

Vul: None

North dealt

South Holds


- KQJ5

- A43

- 5

- 65432

The Bidding Thus Far

South

West

North

East

----

----

1

Pass

1

Pass

2

Pass

?????

 

 

 

The Panel's Votes

Action

Score

Expert's

Votes

Panel's

Votes

Pass

100

8

51

4

80

2

26

3

60

2

50

3

60

1

12

2NT

50

0

4

3

50

0

20

What is your bid?

There are two good answers to this problem. You can pass and go plus or you can bid 4, a game try. When you bid 4, you will try to make game! Any other bid just complicates the situation. Plus scores are good at matchpoints. Usually when you make a game try, you want partner to evaluate his holding in that suit. Opposite five little clubs, only shortness, the ace, or solid clubs are good. All other holdings such as KJx might look good but won’t make 4 a good contract. It doesn’t make sense to make a game try in a suit where partner can’t evaluate his holding. This is the main reason why the experts pass 2.           

Parker: ”Pass---Non vulnerable at match points you do not want to go minus. Play the contract better and get more match points that way. A 3-game try would not be pretty opposite Qxx of clubs.”

Woolsey: ”Pass---If I knew the raise promised four, I would invite. If I had a short-suit game try available, I would make one. Without either of these, I believe that at matchpoints passing is the percentage action.”

Cappelletti: ”Pass---Now that you have maneuvered into a favorable situation, why would you bid and try to go for a large penalty?”

Deverin: ”Pass---Take the plus score. It's OK to have a few extra points. Your holding in partner's diamond suit is poor.”

Theurer: ”Pass---With only four trumps and a singleton in partner's suit, this is a marginal game try hand at best - at IMPs I'd be more inclined to make a try, but at matchpoints it doesn't pay to stretch to thin games very often - go plus on this one.  Maybe the opponents will balance and we can get a chance to double them especially if partner has only three trumps and a sound defensive hand.”

King: ”Pass---At IMPs I might make a game try, but at Matchpoints I want to preserve my plus score.”

Landen: ”Pass---Pass fast and hope they balance. If so, lower the boom. Game might have a decent play, but I doubt it's cold and at matchpoints I won't stretch. I assume in Washington Standard you're not allowed to raise on three (I disagree), but a 4-3 fit will play well with this hand.”

Raising on three is a partnership understanding. I try not to raise on three but sometimes there is no alternative.    

Three experts make a game try. The problem with making a game try in clubs is how is partner supposed to know that his Qxx of clubs is not what you need.

Adams: ”3---Pass is tempting. Could not have made my spots any less appealing, and I might listen to my opponents tempo at the table and pass. I have a pretty textbook invite however, so am resisting urge to mastermind.”

Hopkins: ”3---Even at matchpoints where it is best to be conservative and ensure a plus score, this hand is worth a game try. A few Aces and Club shortness, for example, would lead to a likely ten tricks on cross-ruff lines. I wonder if 3 would be a counter-counter game try if partner counters with 3?”

Lublin: ”3---I make a game try with 3. Partner will accept with stiff in either hearts or clubs.”

Two experts make my type of game try. They will try to make game. When you make you make game tries you give opponents information and they might be able to defend better. If they see that suits are splitting badly they could double if they know you’re stretching.

Schwartz: ”4---Can try to stop on a dime by showing clubs or a stiff diamond but all that will do is help the opponents.”

Roman: ”4---If 2NT is an artificial ask which will tell me if partner has three or four spades I would bid that...this isn't the time for a 4-3 fit.”

Try to avoid making game tries.


Problem 5

Imps

Vul: Both

West dealt

South Holds


- Void

- AQJ10972

- 3

- AK862

The Bidding Thus Far

South

West

North

East

----

3

Pass

Pass

?????

 

 

 

 

The Panel's Votes

Action

Score

Expert's

Votes

Panel's

Votes

4

100

5

43

5

90

2

22

6

80

2

14

4

60

3

63

Dbl

30

1

18

4NT

20

0

3

5

20

0

1

4

0

0

1

What is your bid?

How do you show a hand that’s too good to bid 4? Easy! You jump to 5. When you overcall 4 you think you can probably make at least 2.  Holding xAQJxxxKQxQxx, you have to close your eyes and bid 4. This is a bidder’s game. On bad days you go for a large number. More often partner has a few honors and you make 4. 5 shows a stronger hand, a hand where you know you can make 4, and probably make at least 5. Opposite the problem hand there are three honors out there that can help you, Ace of diamonds, King of hearts, Queen of clubs. The odds say that partner will have at least one of these honors. The fact that East passed 3 makes it more likely that partner has strength and has your missing honors. If you jump to 5, you give partner a chance to use his judgment.   

    One expert agrees with me and invites slam.

Adams: ”5---Just a guess. Partner will not know which minor suit Qxx helps me, but will know that Diamond Ace and Heart King are good cards.”

Two experts bid slam. Since partner will not know what he needs, bidding a slam is a good shot. Good shot with East passing 3.

Hopkins: ”6---I am going to be straightforward. I could make if partner has as little as the Club Queen and 8x of Hearts. Double is too risky. Here everybody guesses.”

Roman: ”6---I went to the attic, found my old Magic eight-Ball, shook it up and asked if I would make 6... "It Is Decidedly So". Seriously, I'm bidding what I hope I can make.”

    Five experts bid 4. 4 is Michaels showing hearts and a minor at least five-five. I don’t know what that will accomplish. Partner will probably have minor-suit length and will want to know which minor you have. He won’t know that you can play in hearts opposite a void. Since you are planning to bid hearts, partner won’t know which minor you have. Since this is not a discussed auction, he probably won’t have any idea about what you have other than wanting to play in hearts.

Parker: ”4---And then 6 over any bid. This should allow partner to evaluate the diamond ace and heart king if he has them. A direct jump to 6 basically shuts him out.”

 Woolsey: ”4---Presumably this is Michaels. Likely partner will bid 4NT, asking for my minor. When I then bid 5, I'm clearly showing slam interest. He will have to guess, of course, but at least he can make some kind of educated guess from this information.”

Cappelletti: ”4---Since there is no better way to describe your hand, showing a two-suiter with hearts might lead to the right spot (like if partner has three or more clubs and a stiff or void heart. If this hand had Queen of clubs also, then I would try gambling 6, hoping to get a favorable lead. As it is - even with favorable lead, 6 might go down.”

Deverin: ”4---Shows two unspecified suits. If (when) partner bids 5, you will bid 5. It's then partner's choice to pass, or bid 6 or 6.”

King: ”4---I might end up going minus with this bid, but my hand is too good to just bid 4 and I would not be happy if I doubled and partner passed.”

Three experts voted conservative. In direct seat it would make some sense to be conservative but in passout seat where partner has to have values, bidding only 4 is wimpy.

Theurer: ”4---This looks like an underbid, but there's no guarantee partner has either (working) cards or a fit, something like 4153 shape is quite possible. The hand is too freakish to double. If the opponents compete to 4 I can try 5.”

Lublin: ”4---Don’t want to double and defend but will sit double of 4.”   

Schwartz: ”4---If the opponents had raised, my hand would have been much better but East’s pass is worrisome with heart length more likely. Thus I will go for a plus score.”  

Double is scary since it could very easily be left in. Wouldn’t you pass 3- doubled holding Q10xxKxxxxQJxx? Might not even beat it.

Landen: ”Double---Then settle for 4 over four-of-a-minor. I may well miss a slam, but I'm not in the mood to take a wild shot and I have no five-level safety after a minimum response from partner. Over partner's 3NT, I'll jump to 5 and hope partner interprets this as strength showing and not asking for any particular feature. Hands like this are why we all love to preempt.”

Partner is never supposed to be broke in this type of auction. If he is get a new partner.


Expert / Problem

1

2

3

4

5

Score

John Adams

4

3

3NT

3

5

400

Mike Cappelletti

Dbl

3NT

Pass Pass

4

350

Mike Deverin

4

3

Pass Pass

4

390

Robbie Hopkins
Pass

3

Pass

3

6

360

Steve Landen

4

3

Pass Pass

Dbl

370

Glenn Lublin

4

3

3

3

4

320

Fred King

Dbl

3

Dbl

Pass

4

440

Steve Parker

4

3NT

Dbl

Pass

4

470

Steve Robinson

Pass

2NT

Dbl

Pass

5

460

Jeff Roman

Dbl

3NT

Pass

4

6

310

Alan Schwartz

2

2NT

3NT

4

4

340

Brad Theurer

4

3

3

Pass

4

370

Kit Woolsey

4

2NT

Dbl

Pass

4

490